in motion: Chino y Nacho's new videos, low-price Internet for low-income familes and face substitution

slideshow

in motion: Chino y Nacho's new videos, low-price Internet for low-income familes and face substitution

  • Nacho hammers out some poetry on his typewriter and Chino is his muse in Chino & Nacho's new video, "El Poeta."
  • (Sergio Dionisio/Getty) Low income families will now be able to purchase internet for less than $10 a month in Comcast territories across the country. The company's new program, Internet Essentials, will make low speed internet packages available to families with at least one child qualifying for the free school lunch program at public schools and will also offer $150 computers.The program helps Comcast meet government requirements for its purchase of NBC Universal earlier this year.
  • (Scott Olson/Getty) The number of immigration bills proposed in state capitals reached a record 1,592 this year, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. The spike in bill introductions may have been inspired by Arizona, which introduced the harshest anti-immigrant bill last year. But the number of bills actually signed into law (162) fell by one–fourth and may be due to the backlash Arizona has faced since passing such laws, according to conference experts.
  • Face swap: computer engineer Arturo Castro shows off his cool (and creepy) face substitution technique.
  • (Kevork Djansezian/Getty) There is less crime near marijuana dispensaries when they're open as opposed to when they're closed, according to a new study. The study is based on findings that looked at what happened in Los Angeles last year when nearly 400 dispensaries were forced to shut down temporarily. The report by the Rand Corporation found that crime increased by 59 percent in the area closest to a closed dispensary when compared to an open one. "What I would take away from it is maybe there should just be a little bit less fear about having dispensaries," said Mireille Jacobson, a health economist who was the lead researcher.
  • (John Moore/Getty) President Barack Obama's administration is on pace to deport more immigrants in one term (1.06 million) than former President George W. Bush did (1.57 million) in two terms.
  • An interactive picture of poverty in the U.S shows how most states' poverty rates have risen since 1980. The nationwide poverty rate hit a high of 15.1 percent last year, up from 14.3 percent in 2009. For Latinos the rate is much higher, 26.6 percent for 2010.
Advertisement