ho ho: Selena Gomez's stalker admits he's dangerous, Santa mysteriously pays off store bills and Facebook tries to stop suicides

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ho ho: Selena Gomez's stalker admits he's dangerous, Santa mysteriously pays off store bills and Facebook tries to stop suicides

  • (Brandon Wade/Getty) Anonymous "secret Santas" are popping up at retail stores around the country and paying off the layaway balances of people with big bills. In one case a woman in Michigan picked three accounts with toy purchases and paid off $500, leaving only $10 on each account and a note: "Happy Holidays from a friend."
  • (Ian Gavan/Getty) "I believe that a restraining order should be issued against me to prevent me from trying to contact Selena Gomez." Thomas Brodnicki, the man who says he has had "conversations with God" about killing the pop singer is siding with Gomez, who is seeking a permanent restraining order against him after felony stalking charges against him were dismissed last month.
  • The trio of Mexican siblings known as Vazquez Sounds are back on YouTube with their version of Mariah Carey's hit, All I want for Christmas Is You.
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  • (Dan Kitwood/Getty) Facebook has launched a new suicide prevention tool to flag an update that might indicate suicidal thoughts. Facebook then emails the user in distress and connects him or her with a counselor from the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.
  • (image via Children's Hospital Boston) Meet Jonas and Nicole Maines, 14-year-old siblings who were originally born as identical twin boys. Nicole, who was formerly named Wyatt, now lives as a girl.
  • (image via Wikimedia Commons) If the mall isn't your thing, considera pawn shop this holiday season. Pawn shops around the country are reporting a big boost in sales this year, due in part to the shops becoming more mainstream thanks to shows like "Pawn Stars" and "Hardcore Pawn" and because people are looking to save money in a tougher economy.
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  • (Warrick Page/Getty) An increasing number of old batteries being set to Mexico to be recycled are being handled in ways that are illegal in the U.S., exposing plant workersplant workers, residents and children in many poorer Mexican neighborhoods to toxic lead levels. In 2007, only about 6 percent of used American batteries were sent to Mexico. That number has climbed to 20 percent, or about 20 million batteries that will cross the border this year.
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