daily dos: DJ Pauly D's new video, NYPD to change "stop and frisk" and a priest is busted for his sins

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daily dos: DJ Pauly D's new video, NYPD to change "stop and frisk" and a priest is busted for his sins

  • Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg is now worth an estimated $20 billion after the social networking giant began trading its stock today. An estimated 1,000 Facebook employees reportedly became millionaires after Facebook's stock market debut.

    (Spencer Platt/Getty)
  • A 18,239-pound chocolate replica of the Mayan Temple of Kukulkan now holds the Guiness World Record for the world's largest chocolate sculpture. The six-foot tall pyramid was made by dessert company Qzina Specialty Foods and took more than 400 hours to complete.

    (image by Qzina via flickr)
  • A California woman's pockets burst into flames after she went collecting rocks in her pocket. Authorities say the rocks that were found on San Onofre State Beach in San Diego County may have been coated with phosphorous which caused the shorts to catch fire, leaving the victim with severe burns.

    (Orange County Fire Authority)
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  • Kanye West is debuting his new film Cruel Summer at the Cannes Film Festival. The films is described as "an immersive ‘7 screen experience’ for the eyes and ears unlike anything West has attempted before."

    (Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty)
  • Ex-priest John Fiala has been found guilty of plotting to kill the man who accused him of sexual abuse. Fiala faces up to life in prison.
  • DJ Pauly D pops a few bottles and moves hundreds of booties in a new video, "Night Of My Life," featuring Dash.
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  • NYPD police commissioner Raymond Kelly announced that the NYPD is looking to make changes to its controversial "stop and frisk" policy. The move comes after a U.S. district judge recently ruled that there was "overwhelming evidence" that "stop and frisk" led to illegal stops. An estimated 630,000 people – mostly black and Hispanic men – were stopped by the NYPD last year. About 10 percent of the stops led to arrests.

    (Mario Tama/Getty)
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